Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a method of using freezing temperatures to treat various skin conditions. Usually, the cryogen is liquid nitrogen under pressure which is stored in a canister and used to target the tissue.

What are the conditions that can be treated with Cryotherapy?

There are a variety of skin conditions that can be treated effectively with Cryotherapy. These include viral infections called warts, acne scars, skin tags, molluscum contagiousum, seborrheic keratosis, and leukoplakia.

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Frequently Asked Questions

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What are the conditions that can be treated with Cryotherapy?

There are a variety of skin conditions that can be treated effectively with Cryotherapy. These include viral infections called warts, acne scars, skin tags, molluscum contagiousum, seborrheic keratosis, and leukoplakia.

How does cryotherapy work?

The intense cold causes damage to the targeted cells. There is swelling and dead cells, followed by resolution of the unwanted skin lesion.

What are the advantages of Cryotherapy?

This is a painless and quick outpatient treatment. This has the advantage of being relatively pain-free, as the intense cold causes anesthesia during treatment. This makes cryotherapy treatment a great choice for children. This is also a no-touch treatment, minimizing the chances of cross infection or contamination.

What is the aftercare?

As there is no breach of the skin during the treatment, there is no specific aftercare needed. Rarely, a small cryoblister may appear at the treatment site, which will resolve itself without the need for any additional treatment.

When can I see the results?

Results are seen after 2 to 3 sessions, with the complete resolution of the lesions. Treatments are spaced 1 to 2 weeks apart.

Disclaimer- Dr. Dixit Cosmetic Dermatology reserves all the rights of this website. The information published on this website is correct to the best of our knowledge. However, this is generic in nature and does not apply to an individual case.